In 2011, the Cave Archaeology Investigation & Research Network contacted Enomalies with an incredible collaborative opportunity. Working alongside Huntsbrook and The Exploration Foundation, Enomalies engineers rappelled into a cave on the outskirts of St. Louis, MO. Structured light scanning equipment in tow, the objective was to piece together the history and happenings of a cave that has gone unexplored for over 600 years. In the cave the team found cave drawings, human and animal footprints, and amazing natural structures. The expedition was recorded and aired in a documentary, showcased on the Archaeology Channel.

After capturing the 3D data from the cave, Enomalies created printed models of the scanned footprints, giving the archaeologists a new tool for estimating size and weight of the indigenous population at the time.

A bear print captured in the mud

A bear print captured in the mud

3D Model of the structured light scan of the bear print to scale

3D Model of the structured light scan of the bear print to scale

Watch the Archaeology Channel Documentary

Archaeology Channel Excerpt:

Six hundred years ago, humans, black bears, and mountain lions were inhabiting a Missouri cave. When the entrance collapsed, everything was trapped inside, creating a time capsule not to be discovered until a small hole in the ceiling exposed the cave in 1985. In this 30-minute documentary by Emmy-winning director Christian Cudnik, rappel 65 feet into the darkness and follow cave archaeologists as they document prehistoric footprints, rock art, torch marks, bear tracks, beds, and much more in this cave north of Springfield, Missouri.

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